Threatened Species of the Capricorn Region

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Threatened reptile species 

Endangered
There are three reptile species in the Capricornia region that falls into this category.  

Definition: A species is considered to be endangered if it has not been seen in the wild for a period of time, habitat has been reduced to the point where the species is in danger of extinction, the population size has reduced to a point where the species is in danger of extinction or the survival of the species in the wild is unlikely if a threatening process continues. 
Endangered Threatened by

Grey Snake Threats suspected to have affected this species are land clearing, the introduction of cane toads (poisoning through ingestion) and destruction of wetlands.
Leatherback Turtle    The main threats are pollution and changes to important turtle habitats, especially coral reefs, seagrass beds, mangrove forests and nesting beaches. Other threats include accidental drowning in fishing gear and over-harvesting of turtles and eggs. Adults have been washed up on beaches in Sydney, New South Wales, after having drowned in shark nets.
Loggerhead Turtle    Although the loggerhead turtle population is showing signs of recovery, they are still threatened by light pollution, boat strike, feral predators, and crab pots.

Vulnerable
There are eight reptile species in the region that is in this category.   

Definition: A species is considered to be vulnerable if its population is decreasing, its population has been seriously depleted, its population is at risk from a threatening process, its population is localised or depends on a limited habitat. 

Vulberable     Threatened by
Fitzroy River Turtle Fitzroy River Turtle    The biggest threat facing the Fitzroy River turtle is the loss of eggs and the disturbance of nesting sites from predation by feral pigs, foxes and goannas. The age of individuals within the populations of this species indicate that very few turtles have hatched in recent decades as a result of nest predation. The construction of weirs along the Fitzroy River has also reduced the amount of suitable habitat for this and other species of freshwater turtles - particularly those species requiring well-oxygenated flowing water. This turtle is also threatened by the pollution and siltation of rivers and creeks, and the modification of riparian (waterway) vegetation by grazing and agricultural practices, mining, and timber harvesting.

 Brigalow Scaly-foot
(legless lizard)   
The Brigalow scaly-foot is threatened by habitat loss due to land clearing and thinning operations, inappropriate road side management, and predation by feral animals such as cats. Habitat degradation from overgrazing and accidental deaths on roads and from misidentification with snakes, may pose additional threats.
Dunmall’s Snake Dunmall's snake is threatened by habitat loss due to land clearing and thinning operations, inappropriate road side management, and predation by feral animals. Potential threats include habitat degradation from pasture improvement and grazing activities.
Flatback Turtle    Feral pigs are responsible for high levels of nest-predation. The pig’s keen sense of smell allows them to locate buried turtle nests and subsequently dig up and consume all the contents. Nesting beaches are also disturbed by vehicles and coastal development. Uncontrolled vehicles can damage nests and disturb laying turtles. Light pollution at night from shops and houses can disorientate hatchlings causing them to move inland where they are easy prey for other animals.
Green Turtle    Although the green turtle population is recovering, they are still threatened by unsustainable hunting, boat strike, and drowning in crab pots.
Hawksbill Turtle    The main threats are pollution and changes to important turtle habitats, especially coral reefs, mangrove forests and nesting beaches. Other threats include accidental drowning in fishing gear and over-harvesting of turtles and eggs.
Ornamental Snake    Potential threats to this species include habitat loss due to land clearing and thinning operations, grazing pressure and poisoning by cane toads.
Yakka Skink    The Yakka skink is threatened by habitat loss due to land clearing and thinning operations, inappropriate road side management, removal of woody debris and rocks that provide refuge and predation by feral animals.

What can you do to help?
If you would like to help our threatened species there are a number of ways that you can get involved.  You can contact the CCC Coordinator to enquire about community involvementor you can become directly involved in one of the programs described below.
Fitzroy River Turtle
Greening Australia is running a conservation project to help the Fitzroy River Turtle and you can read about it on their web site at:  http://www.greeningaustralia.org.au/community/news-item?newsItemId=126&state=4&newsListingUrl=community/qld&nationalId=7
If you are interested in getting involved contact Greening Australia at 19 Willis Street, Rockhampton QLD 4700.  Tel: 07 4923 7542 Fax: 07 4923 7546
Mon Repos Conservation Park volunteer
Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) require volunteers to assist with nightly operations at Mon Repos (Bundaberg) where Loggerhead Turtles nest every year.  Read about what volunteers are required to do at http://bundaberg.qld.gov.au/files/Recruit%20poster%2009turtles.pdf
If you are interested in volunteering contact the Ranger at Mon Repos on (07) 4159 1652.


Information source
The source of information for the threatened bird species in Capricornia was the Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM) website at http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/wildlife-ecosystems/wildlife/threatened_plants_and_animals/index.html