Threatened Species of the Capricorn Region

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Threatened fish species 

Endangered
There are two fish species in the Capricornia region that falls into this category.  

Definition: A species is considered to be endangered if it has not been seen in the wild for a period of time, habitat has been reduced to the point where the species is in danger of extinction, the population size has reduced to a point where the species is in danger of extinction or the survival of the species in the wild is unlikely if a threatening process continues. 
Endangered Threatened by
The endangered Edgbaston Goby
Edgbaston goby
(inhabits artesian springs)
Threats to the Edgbaston goby include land degradation by domestic and feral animals, competition with the mosquito fish, physical alteration of artesian springs to increase the volume of water for stock, reduced habitat area and quality resulting from exotic ponded pasture species and diminishing spring flows resulting from water extraction.
Red-finned Blue-eye
(inhabits artesian springs)
Threats to the red-finned blue-eye include land degradation by domestic and feral animals, competition with the mosquito fish, physical alteration of the springs to increase the volume of water for stock, reduced habitat area and quality resulting from ponded pasture species and diminishing spring flows resulting from water extraction.




The endangered Edgbaston Goby
The endangered Edgbaston Goby
This species is known from Edgbaston Springs on Edgbaston Station, approximately 30km north-east of Aramac in central Queensland. Gobies genetically similar to Edgbaston gobies have also been found in bore drains on Crossmoor Station. Edgbaston Springs and Crossmoor Station are located in the Thomson River catchment, which is a part of the Cooper Creek system. Edgbaston gobies were formerly known from eleven artesian springs but presently occur in only six springs.

The Edgbaston goby is a small bottom dwelling species that grows to about 60mm in length. Males in breeding condition become quite colourful. The body colour grades from olive on the back to golden yellow on the belly with a chequered pattern of dark blotches on the rear sides. The fins are varying shades and patterns of blue to black and have a greyish white margin. The top of the first dorsal fin has a yellow flash.